01 January 2008

The KDGS Cemetery Recording Project

January 2009 Update
Starting in 1985, KDGS began to transcribe the cemeteries located in the area from Peachland to Oyama and published these transcriptions. These booklets are no longer available. Now, a committee is actively working on updating these transcriptions.

The Cemetery Recording Committee is in the process of compiling the information from recent transcription fieldtrips and plans to have new updated booklets and/or CDs available for sale. We are presently working on new transcriptions for:

• Peachland Cemetery and Cenotaph
• Westbank Cemetery
• Oyama Community Cemetery
• Old Winfield Cemetery
• Winfield Cemetery
• St. Theresa Cemetery
• Immaculate Conception Cemetery
• St. Andrew’s Cemetery
• Kelowna Cemetery and Cenotaph

Photographs have been taken of the gravemarkers in Peachland and Westbank Cemeteries and these are now available for viewing online at Murray Pletsch’s website, British Columbia Gravemarker Gallery, in the Thompson Okanagan section http://www.gravemarkers.ca/british/okanagan/index.htm

Photographs of Oyama Community Cemetery and St. Theresa Cemetery are in the process of being compiled and will be available later at this site.

If you have any questions about this project or want further information, please contact Susan, Chairperson of the Cemetery Recording Committee, at susandec at gmail.com

Okanagan Researcher: Beaverdell and Carmi voters list

Okanagan Researcher, Vol. 15 (4), June 1999

Beaverdell and Carmi Voters' List for the 1935 Federal Election


Extracted and compiled by Kenneth G. Aitken

Copyright June 1999 by Kenneth G. Aitken, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

For the genealogist, the challenge of finding a surrogate for a census when doing early 20th century Canadian research is a real challenge. At the time of writing there is great concern by the historical and genealogical community about Stats Canada's reluctance to make the 1911 and other 20th century censuses available to the public. Until this issue is resolved, the genealogist must continue to search for surrogates for the census. One of the most common surrogates mentioned in the genealogical literature is the voters' list. The List of Electors, 1935 for Beaverdell and Carmi, attached to this article, is a sample of such a voters' list. This voters' list has certain limitations. The greatest limitation is that it is limited to those who are Canadian citizens or British subjects who have lived a certain period of time in the Carmi, Beaverdell area and who are over the age of 21 years, the legal voting age in 1935. Another serious limitation is that married or widowed women are identified solely by their husband's name: "Mrs. Anthony Shavela", rather than something more practical to the genealogists, like: "Ida Mae Shavela". Another limitation is the absence of relationships and ages.

The attached voters list was created under the provision of the Dominion Franchise Act, which directed the federal government to create Lists of Electors for use in federal elections. The List of Electors for 1935 has been microfilmed, as have most other federal voters lists up to at least the late 1970s and are available from the National Archives of Canada.

The Lists of Electors are arranged alphabetically by the name of the electoral district (constituency) within each province. Beaverdell and Carmi fall in the Yale Electoral District. Within the electoral districts the lists are further arranged by polling station number and then by street address. Beaverdell and Carmi fall with Rural polling Station No. 6, "Beaverdell". The only time these polling station lists are arranged alphabetically by the name of the elector is for some of the rural electoral districts and polling stations. Polling Station No. 6, Beaverdell is a good example. The original was not arranged in strict alphabetical order, but by first letter order. I have noted this is quite common on most lists in 1935.

The microfilm series for the 1935 electoral rolls are found in the National Archives of Canada and are listed in their Finding Aid 113-1 which covers the Office of the Chief Returning Officer. This Finding Aid was published in February 1989 and can be purchased from the National Archives of Canada. Yale Electoral District is found on microfilm M-4761.




Dominion Franchise Act

List of Electors, 1935

Electoral District of Yale, Rural Polling Division No. 6, Beaverdell

Surname
Given
Occupation
PO Address
Barrett,
George
miner
Beaverdell
Beamish,
Edward
miner
Beaverdell
Bell,
Alexander John
miner
Beaverdell
Benson,
William
miner
Beaverdell
Berchtold,
Fred
section man
Carmi
Berchtold,
Walter
section man
Carmi
Berger,
Leona, Miss
housekeeper
Carmi
Blackburne,
William
miner
Beaverdell
Bongalis,
George
section foreman
Beaverdell
Bongalis,
George, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Bongalis,
Paul
section man
Beaverdell
Bongalis,
Paul, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Bradley,
John
miner
Carmi
Brodie,
John
miner
Beaverdell
Brown,
Richard, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Brown,
Richard
miner
Beaverdell
Bubar,
Bayard
farmer
Beaverdell
Bubar,
Bayard, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Bubar,
Chas
farmer
Beaverdell
Bubar,
Chas, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Cameron,
Angus
miner
Beaverdell
Cameron,
Angus, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Cappos,
Constantine
section man
Beaverdell
Christisen,
Nels
miner
Carmi
Clarke,
Thos
postmaster
Beaverdell
Clarke,
Thos, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Cook,
John
cook
Beaverdell
Cousins,
Edward
miner
Beaverdell
Cousins,
Edward, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Cousins,
Irvine
miner
Beaverdell
Cousins,
Francis
truck driver
Beaverdell
Cousins,
Francis, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Crowe,
Thos. Edward
blacksmith
Beaverdell
Crowe,
Thos. Edward, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Cummings,
Ewart Gladstone
miner
Beaverdell
Dickson,
Gordon
miner
Beaverdell
Didcote,
Frank
section forman
Beaverdell
Didcote,
Frank, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Drum,
James
miner
Beaverdell
Drum,
James, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Eaton,
John Wesley
farmer
Beaverdell
Eaton,
John Wesley, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Edstrom,
Elmer Atli Efraim
miner
Beaverdell
Ellett,
Bert Ernest, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Ellett,
Bert Ernest
miner
Beaverdell
Elliott,
Chas. Franklin
miner
Beaverdell
Elliott,
Chas. Franklin, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Ferroux,
Jean Francois
farmer
Carmi
Ferroux,
Leon John
section man
Carmi
Ferroux,
Leon, Mrs.
married woman
Carmi
Fletcher,
Alfred Sydney
miner
Beaverdell
Ford,
Henry
section man
Carmi
Foster,
Ira Low
miner
Beaverdell
Fripp,
Humphrey
miner
Beaverdell
Fripp,
Humphrey, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Fritz,
Frank
blacksmith
Carmi
Fry,
Herbert
miner
Beaverdell
Fry,
Herbert, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Gachain,
Jean Pierre
carpenter
Carmi
Gallioz,
John B.
postmaster
Carmi
Gallioz,
John B., Mrs.
married woman
Carmi
Gilmore
Chas. Ernest
farmer
Beaverdell
Gilmore
Irma, Miss
housekeeper
Carmi
Gustafson,
Axel, Mrs.
cook
Beaverdell
Gustafson
Kermit
miner
Beaverdell
Halstrom,
John
miner
Beaverdell
Hanna,
Adeline, Miss
spinster
Beaverdell
Hanna,
John, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Hanna,
John Alex
mine supt.
Beaverdell
Harrison,
James
farmer
Beaverdell
Harrison,
James, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Henderson,
Thos.
miner
Beaverdell
Henderson,
Thos., Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Hendrickson,
Arthur
miner
Beaverdell
Hood,
Delbert E.
labourer
Beaverdell
Hood,
Delbert, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Horner,
Geoffrey
farmer
Beaverdell
Houck,
Henry, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Houck,
Henry
storekeeper
Beaverdell
Houlind,
Oluf
miner
Beaverdell
Hoyes,
Wm. Thomas
physician
Beaverdell
Hurley,
Wm. Allan
miner
Beaverdell
Inglis,
George Ross, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Inglis,
George Ross
miner
Beaverdell
Jackson,
Eric E.
miner
Beaverdell
Jensen,
Frederick
miner
Beaverdell
Johnson,
Jarl
miner
Beaverdell
Keefe,
Eulie
miner
Beaverdell
Keefe,
Walter
labourer
Beaverdell
Keefe,
Walter, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Kelley,
George
miner
Carmi
Kennedy,
William
mine foreman
Carmi
Kernaghan,
William
truck driver
Beaverdell
Kernaghan,
Wm, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Kerr,
James
miner
Carmi
Kerr,
James, Mrs.
married woman
Carmi
Kerr,
Mary, Miss
stenographer
Carmi
Kerr,
Daniel
miner
Beaverdell
Kerr,
John
miner
Carmi
Lane,
John D.
miner
Beaverdell
Legiest,
Raymond
engineer
Carmi
Lind,
Charles
miner
Beaverdell
Lind,
Charles, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Lindsay,
Thos.
school teacher
Beaverdell
Lord,
Edward
mechanic
Beaverdell
Lowndees,
John
miner
Beaverdell
Lucente,
Leonard
miner
Beaverdell
Lutner,
Edwin Charles
labourer
Beaverdell
Lutner,
Peter
retired man
Beaverdell
Madge,
Victor Edward
miner
Beaverdell
Marsh,
Thomas
section foreman
Carmi
Marsh,
Thomas, Mrs.
married woman
Carmi
Matheson,
James
farmer
Carmi
Mattson,
Nels
mine supt.
Beaverdell
McDonald
Finley
mail carrier
Beaverdell
McKenzie,
Donald Edward
labourer
Beaverdell
McKenzie,
Donald Edward, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
McLanders,
Roy
miner
Beaverdell
McLanders,
Roy, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
McLennon,
Stanley
miner
Beaverdell
McPhee,
Alex
miner
Beaverdell
McPhee,
Alex, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Michaud,
Albert
miner
Beaverdell
Monroe,
Geo. Alex.
section man
Carmi
Monroe,
Geo. Alex., Mrs.
married woman
Carmi
Montgomery,
Wm. Boydell
surveyor
Beaverdell
Moran,
Patrick, Mrs.
hotel keeper
Beaverdell
Morrison,
Allan Richmond
miner
Beaverdell
Morrison,
John Donald
miner
Beaverdell
Morrison,
John Donald, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Mosti,
Edward
miner
Beaverdell
Muir,
Thomas, Mrs.
hotel keeper
Carmi
Muir,
Thomas
blacksmith
Carmi
Mulhern,
Samuel
miner
Beaverdell
Mulhern,
Samuel, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Murray,
Duncan John
miner
Beaverdell
Neaves,
Ira
cook
Beaverdell
Neaves,
William, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Neaves,
William
miner
Beaverdell
Nordman,
Charles
miner
Beaverdell
Nordman,
Charles, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Noren,
Carl
farmer
Beaverdell
North,
Albert, Mrs.
housekeeper
Beaverdell
Olsen,
Charles
section man
Carmi
Paterson,
Gordon
miner
Beaverdell
Pederson,
Hans A.
restaurant keeper
Beaverdell
Pederson,
Hans A., Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Perry,
Robt. Henry
miner
Beaverdell
Petterson,
Frank Oscar
farmer
Beaverdell
Rambo,
Washington H.
miner
Beaverdell
Richter,
Frank Edward Sumner
bookkeeper
Beaverdell
Robertson,
Malcolm
section man
Carmi
Rose,
Emil
blacksmith
Beaverdell
Rusch,
Roscoe
section foreman
Carmi
Rusch,
Roscoe, Mrs.
married woman
Carmi
Russell,
Charles
mechanic
Beaverdell
Russell,
Harold
miner
Beaverdell
Russell,
William
miner
Beaverdell
Sargent,
Clayton
section man
Carmi
Saunders,
Thos. Edward
miner
Beaverdell
Saunders,
Thos. Edward, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Saunier,
Eugene
miner
Carmi
Schofield,
Arthur
steam engineer
Carmi
Schofield,
Arthur, Mrs.
married woman
Carmi
Shavela,
Anthony
cook
Beaverdell
Shavela,
Anthony, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Shuster,
Anthony
miner
Beaverdell
Smith,
David
retired man
Beaverdell
Smith,
Edward George
trapper
Beaverdell
Smith,
Mark
miner
Beaverdell
Smith,
Mark, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Snider,
Charles
labourer
Beaverdell
Snider,
Charles, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Staples,
Edwin Palmer
miner
Beaverdell
Sutherland,
George Duncan
blacksmith
Beaverdell
Sutherland,
James
farmer
Beaverdell
Swanson,
Swan Julius
miner
Beaverdell
Thomas,
Joseph
section man
Carmi
Thompson,
Milton
miner
Beaverdell
Timmermeister,
Frederick
mine foreman
Beaverdell
Vickery,
Aldo
miner
Carmi
Warrington,
Wm.
miner
Beaverdell
Warrington,
Wm., Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Watson,
David
carpenter
Carmi
Worthing,
Reginald
miner
Beaverdell
Worthing,
Reginald, Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Worthing,
Thos.
miner
Beaverdell
Worthing,
Thos., Mrs.
married woman
Beaverdell
Wynne,
Wm. J.
prospector
Beaverdell
Youngson,
Wm.
hotel keeper
Beaverdell
Copyright June 1999 by Kenneth G. Aitken, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Okanagan Researcher: Lessons Learned in Researching English Ancestry

Okanagan Researcher, Vol. 16 (1), September 1999 Lessons Learned in Researching English Ancestry


by Kenneth G. Aitken

Copyright September 1999 by Kenneth G. Aitken, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Kenneth G. Aitken has been Prairie History Librarian at Regina Public Library, Regina, Saskatchewan for 15 years. He has been researching family history for the past 20 years, the last three as a professional genealogist.

The purpose of this article is to summarize some of the research lessons I have learned, or should have learned, in the twenty years I have been researching English ancestry. The underlying principles of research strategy, and sources in English research I first learned through the works of David Gardiner and Frank Smith. Their three volume set, Genealogical Research in England and Wales1 has been a favourite reference work of mine for 20 years. The thirteen concepts reviewed in this article are drawn from this work. The reader will note references to "we" numerous times in the article. "We" refers to a group of my Hambrook cousins who were learning together the pitfalls of English research.

This article assumes the reader has some familiarity with concepts like "primary and secondary sources" and "direct and indirect evidence". For those who need to brush up on these thing see my article "Evaluating Genealogical Evidence"2. References will be made in examples to parish registers, bishop's transcripts, censuses, probate records and other sources of English genealogical and historical data. Those not familiar with these should consult basic genealogical resource guides for England.

Genealogical and family history research seldom results in absolute proof in pedigree. Researchers devote much of their effort to sifting sorting and organizing a variety of primary and secondary source information about their ancestor. The following thirteen procedures are useful in strengthening or eliminating the acceptance of evidence, and clarifying what is truly a factual record of part of an ancestor's life.

1. Confirm the calculated or stated year of birth and birthplace from the clue document in at least two censuses.

Lets say that you have found a memorial card for your ancestor that was distributed at his funeral in 1924. From this you discover that he died at the grand old age of 88 years. You realize that this is indirect circumstantial evidence of a birth because there was unlikely to be anyone present at the death that had a perfect remembrance of his birth. But you have a clue. You do the math. 1924 minus 88, and come up with a birth year of about 1836, the year before civil registration begins in England. Can you confirm that 1836 is the year? A review of the census returns for 1841 through 1891 would prove most useful here. (Though the 1841 Census for England rounds the ages to the nearest multiple of 5, which will skew dates, it does not round off the ages for those under 15 years, a useful fact in this case.) The several census returns will also help narrow down the possible birth places.

2. Check the census of the stated place of birth in the clue document to determine where there are others of the same name, age and birthplace living there who might be confused with the likely candidate.

Among my Hambrook ancestors there is a problem with Richards: there seem to be one in every family, and they clog up the 1851 to 1881 censuses of Kent. Usually by gathering all of the Richard Hambrooks in the ancestral parish, and the contiguous parishes, I have been able to sort them out. Once in a parish in Kent, however, there were two Richard Hambrooks born less than a year apart, appearing on the census with the same age. I, of course, chose the wrong one, without accounting for all of the census returns. Thus I proposed a line of descent from a boy who died at age 11, and was found in a nonconformist church burial ground. Proceed with caution.

3. Consider ages given in as many dated events as possible to see if they agree as to the year of birth of the ancestor. In cases of wide variation, the earliest is likely to be the more accurate.

When there is a potential for confusion of identities, and there always is to some extent, we need to widen our search to examine not just census returns but monumental inscriptions, baptism, marriage and burial records, and any other records that can clarify birth dates. In my Richard Hambrook error mentioned above, if I had lined up all the monumental inscriptions for Richard Hambrooks in the parish, including those in the nonconformist churchyards, I may have spotted my error. Get the ducks lined up in a row chronologically, and value those records created earliest more than the later ones. That is to say, let later dated information be the support for the earliest data, and be hesitant to accept more precise dates that run counter to the early documented dates. From the Bible comes the notion we use in law even today; in the mouths of two or three witnesses shall the truth be known.

4. Search for birth or christening records from 5 years before the calculated birth year to the year of marriage looking for others of the same name and birthplace who might be confused with the likely candidate.

This may puzzle the researcher, so let me explain. Lets assume you have discovered the marriage of a James Atkins in a parish register in Warwickshire in 1821. The entry says he is a bachelor, but the age is simple, "of full age", meaning he is not a minor. You want to find his christening date. In cases like this I assume the person was married at age 26 plus or minus 5 years. Thus placing his birth date between 1790 and 1800. However as we are looking for a christening date we need to allow for the fact that he may have slipped through the cracks and was christened as a young adult, or was a precocious young man who married a tad early. Consequently we will widen the search beginning in 1790 and continuing to the actual marriage date in 1821.

I find this the hardest procedure to follow because there is a tendency to think that when we have found someone in the record being searched that fits our need, that we cry "Eureka!" and stop looking. Over the years I have found it best to continue plowing through the record, extracting and rounding up all the likely suspects. There can be some real surprises. While researching a family in Warwickshire last year I found a christening in a Church of England parish register that fit perfectly the profile I was looking for. However, further down the page, about 13 months later, I found another one. Now I had two James Atkins with the same parents, that fit in the same time frame I was looking for. I continued on. Another possible James Atkins appeared a few years later. He too fit the profile. I added him to the list of suspects. I now had three.

5. Burial records must be searched to determine whether any person found in a birth or christening entry had died as an infant or child. Search all local and neighboring parish burial records of all churches.

This is what someone once referred to as "killing off the impostors". I now had three James Atkins in the parish my James was supposed to be in. A search of the burial records of the parish church eliminated the first James I found. A search for burials in the nearest non-conformist church registers, as well as the registers of the contiguous parishes would be the next step here. In the present problem I had reduced the suspects to 2 possible entries. I had a favourite, but could not eliminate the other so far.

6. Searches should be made for alternative births or christenings in the records of all adjoining or surrounding parishes within a five mile radius for a period of five years before the calculated birth year to the year of marriage looking for others of the same name and birthplace who might be confused with the likely candidate.

I have found that the careful use of maps is most productive in solving these sorts of problems. I have a small collection of Ordnance Survey maps for the county of Kent where most of my research is done, but even the small scale maps in The Phillimore Atlas and Index to Parish Registers3 can be used. Simply copy the relevant county map, and using a compass (do you remember those from your ninth grade geometry class?) measure off 5 miles. Then find the parish where you expected to find your ancestor, and scribe a 5 mile radius circle using that parish as the centre. When you do this with the parish boundary maps you can quickly see the parishes you should be searching. Map study may reveal natural constrictions to, or channels of movement like wide rivers, or mountains which may modify this strategy.

Ancestral connections to military installations may require an extension to the five mile radius. I have found that Kitzmiller's book, In Search of the Forlorn Hope4, to be a useful place to start to identify military camps in England.

Parishes or towns associated with a particular occupation should be included in a search if the occupation is known. A mine worker will most likely move to a place where there are mines; a stone mason to where there are construction projects. One genealogist couldn't find his stone mason in Devon, but learned from his research of other masons in Devonshire working in the Channel Islands, and searching there found his ancestor at a port town where a harbour was being built.

7. In large, heavily populated industrialized parishes, check all the churches in the parish, not just the main parish church, and check the adjoining parishes.

In a search for members of the Hambrook family who moved from east Kent to Middlesex, I searched the records of the main parish church in Islington, but without success. Another genealogist found the family by searching through the all the daughter churches in the rapidly urbanized parish. I felt rather foolish. The challenge in larger urban areas where there are numerous churches is to figure out the most logical places to search first. Here again map work helps. Careful use of city directories can also be most helpful. I have found the best listing of British directories is Shaw and Tipper's British Directories5.

8. The economic conditions of the time and place should be considered. The collapse of older factories, mines, mills, local agriculture etc. may cause out migration. A booming economy in a neighbouring centre may do the same.

I am presently in a rather frustrating search for a Henry Augustus Thompson, a house painter who, though born in Bilton in Warwickshire, was attracted to neighbouring Rugby, then nearby villages, then to Birmingham in search of larger markets for his "have paint, will smear" business. His children were born along the way and may even have been born in an adjoining county. The need to expand the search horizon is there in most research puzzles, but the impact of mobility in the latter half of the 19th century is a real challenge.

9. Check the marriage registers of the candidate's stated place of birth to see if a person of that name might be "married off' to someone other than the known spouse. This check should extend from 15 years after the birth or christening to 40 years after.

In the problem of the two James Atkins mentioned earlier, I found that a review of the parish registers in the region revealed several marriages that might account for one of the two men. This search coupled with a search for the christenings of the wives in the parishes assisted in eliminating one of the James. As Sherlock Holmes put it, after you eliminate the impossible, what is left, no matter how improbable is the truth.

10. In the case of a male ancestor, careful watch should be kept for the possibility of a person with the same name and surname having children born or christened in the same or adjoining parishes. These conflicting possibilities need to be resolved.

Over the past 20 years of doing research I have run into this problem many times. The problem can be complicated when the spouses name is unknown or very common. In the very early 17th century I was searching for a Richard the son of Richard Hambrook and found three possible suspects in the 5 mile radius. Two were married to Elizabeths! All three families were gathered from the various records, and marriage records, christening, burials, tax rolls and probate records were examined. Eventually we sorted through and accounted for all, creating three family groups, establishing relationships between numerous people and discovering two of the elder Richards were cousins, and the other with an as yet unknown relationship. The puzzle took years, and many wills and probate records sorted out but we are more confident ours was the Richard the son of Richard and Margaret.

11. No matter what religious denomination of your ancestor, check the records of all churches in the area: E.G. Church of England, Methodists, Baptists, Quakers, Roman Catholic. Be aware that the areas served by nonconformist chapels and Quaker meeting houses were larger than the traditional Church of England parishes.

As you read this remember my proposed pedigree that was devastated by the discovery of the eleven year old Richard Hambrook who was buried in the Methodist Church yard, thus preventing him from becoming the father of a large family of grocers!

12. When Bishops Transcripts are searched, missing and illegible entries need to be searched in the Parish Registers.

In my most recent researches I have been even more conservative in my faith in parish registers and bishop's transcripts. I read both in their entirety. I have found that in some cases the Bishops transcript is the original, and the parish register, the copy, the reverse of what one would expect. There may be errors and omissions in each.

13. When a search for a birth or christening record fails, consider the possibility that the child was born out of wedlock and took his mother's surname, most likely totally unknown to you. Such a situation calls for listing all entries with the same given name, then matching these names against marriage and death or burial records to determine who might fit.

There was a certain James Hambrook who owned an inn during the mid 19th century in one of the parishes along the Thames estuary. After his own wife had passed on, and his children grown and moved, James seduced the barmaid (or at least I suspect he did). Miss Moore came to live with him and bore him children. The children are listed in the 1851 census as Hambrooks, along with James and his common-law wife. Based on the ages of the children in 1851 a search was made in the parish registers and the Bishop's transcripts without success. Next a search was made of the index to civil registrations for these children under the surname Hambrook. The search was again unsuccessful. At this point in the search someone started to use their head and went looking for the marriage of Miss Moore to James Hambrook and when one was not found, the search began again assuming the children were christened or registered under the surname Moore. In the civil registration of that particular corner of Kent we found the children, most with the second given name of Hambrook, and the surname of Moore. Some of the children married as Moores, some as Hambrooks and one as a Hambrook-Moore. All credit for the discovery and the sound reasoning behind it go to my research colleague. I was the learner.

14. Although naming customs among the English are generally undetectable, odd given names may be clues. One needs to become familiar with the range of names commonly found in a county or area before you can determine whether a name is uncommon enough to be a significant clue. Occasionally surnames appear as given names, and this may help identify parents or grandparents.

Among my Hambrook ancestors and the vast local cousinage of Hambrooks that populate eastern Kent county in England names like Richard, James, John, Elizabeth, and Mary abound. However, from time to time I have found the truly odd name, Oddin Hambrook of Dover, Kent was one such oddly named ancestor. A group of us were collaborating on gathering all 19th century Hambrooks and sorting them into families, a real challenge. Oddin, however, despite three or four marriages, numerous moves, and changes in religious faith, social status etc., was relatively easy to find - at least until he named a son Oddin!

15. When other conflicting birth or christening records are found in other records in the prescribed area, one needs to follow these individuals forward in time through marriage and burial records to eliminate possibilities. Probate records are also useful: check for wills of all fathers of these individuals. If the conflicting individual is found outside the parish of your first candidate, then the searches for marriage and burial information must be made within a five mile radius of the new parish.

Many readers will be horrified at the amount of work that is suggested by these procedures and especially this last one. There is indeed a lot of work involved. I am reminded of an account of the work of a well known professional genealogist, now 1ong deceased, who when he ran out of the easily located records, made up the "facts" necessary to complete his project. His clients would find everything in order until they reviewed the critical link, and their they would not find the record. Many of his fraudulent pedigrees were only discovered years later. Some are still surviving. If your ancestral research is worth doing, its worth doing right.

Concerning probate records, it has been my experience that if a family has resided in an area for some time, it is fruitful to gather not just the wills of all fathers of the suspects you have rounded up, but all those in that part of the county with the same surname, or if the name is an uncommon one, all wills and inventories, etc. in the county or adjoining counties.

There were two Richard Hambrooks with wives named Elizabeth who lived in adjoining parishes, each having a son called Richard. (Readers will have noted that Hambrooks had very imaginative naming patterns). And these sons were born within a year of each other. The problem was finding which was the Richard who married my known ancestor. We knew that our Richard the younger was residing in a particular parish several miles away. In the census was a clue to his birthplace. We extracted all Hambrook baptism, marriage and burial records from the contiguous parishes to those the senior Richards lived in, and established burial dates. All the wills for Richard Hambrooks probated around the times of the burials were examined. Only one of the two suspect senior Richards had a will. His Richard junior was mentioned as residing in another location than our Richard junior was known to reside in at the time. The evidence was not conclusive, but sufficient enough that we felt comfortable declaring for one and not the other christening and parentage.

I have found from my experience messing up on my own research that there is a real value in extracting all instances of the surname you are searching for in the records you search, particularly if the name is not common. For example, when researching members of the Atkins family in Newbold on Avon, Warwickshire, I would extract all the Atkins from the beginning of the register to the end, not just those in the decade of the event of the sought after ancestor. Similarly, when examining the census, I would extract all Atkins in surrounding parishes on the same reel of microfilm as the census for Newbold. Many times this has made it possible when I find the missing link in the immediate puzzle, to push back one or two or three generations without returning to the same microfilmed record later. For a detailed discussion to this approach researchers should seek out another older book, Family History for Fun and profit6.



Endnotes

1Gardner, David E. and Frank Smith. Genealogical Research in England and Wales. Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1958 - 1966 (Revised edition). A three-volume classic in English genealogy. Volume 3 is particularly useful for this subject. 2Kenneth G. Aitken. "Evaluating genealogical evidence", Saskatchewan Genealogical Society Bulletin, Vol. 30, No. I (March 1999) pp. 3-11

3Cecil Humphrey-Smith (ed.) The Phillimore Atlas and Index of Parish Registers. Chichester, West Sussex: Phillimore & Co., 1995

4John M. Kitzmiller. In Search of the Forlorn Hope: A Comprehensive Guide to Locating British Regiments and their Records 1640-W.W.I. Salt Lake City: Manuscript Publishing Foundation, 1988

5Gareth Shaw and Allison Tipper. British Directories: A Bibliography and Guide to Directories Published in England and Wales 1850-1950 , Scotland 1773- 1950. London: Mansell Publishing, 1997

6Vincent L. Jones, Arlene H. Eakle and Mildred H. Christensen. Family History for Fun and Profit. The Salt Lake City: Publishers Press for Genealogical Institute, 1972. This book outlines a jurisdictional approach to family history research, and was an important influence in my work..

Copyright September 1999 by Kenneth G. Aitken, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Okanagan Researcher: Claires British Studies Tour

Okanagan Researcher, Vol. 16 (2), December 1999


Claire's British Studies Tour,

to England, July 1 to 23, 1999


Claire Smith-Burns

BIGHR Tours, Samford University:


My British Genealogical Tour was organized by Samford University's British Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (BIGHR) in Birmingham, AL. It is open to anyone with serious genealogical interests; the Institute also offers genealogical credit courses throughout the year. The seventeen participants on my tour were from Vermont, Alabama, Florida, Texas, Washington, Georgia and BC (three). Various options are usually offered on this annual trip. The tour focuses on different regions of Britain each summer: i.e. Summer 1999 was the English West Country counties; Summer 2000 will be Ireland; Summer 2001 will be Scotland. For more information check the BIGHR Website: www.samford.edu/schools/ighr/ighr.html , or contact Jean Thomason, Director, Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research, Samford University Library, 800 Lakeshore Drive, Birmingham, AL USA 35229. Prices for my tour varied from $2250 to $3300 USD; I received a reduction of $700 USD as I made my own air travel arrangements. The Summer 2000 Irish trip ranges from $1500 to $3600 USD.

The tour is based in London and stays at Daniel House in Kensington. Daniel House is owned by Samford University. It is six stories high (counting the basement) and is divided up into small, Spartan, dormitory-style rooms - some single, some double (bunks), some quadruple, all with cupboards, drawers, a desk and sink. Each floor shares one toilet and shower. I was on the fifth floor and there were 80 stairs from my room to the Breakfast Room. Fitness is desirable, if not required! There are several public sitting areas, a public phone, laundry facilities, a study/lecture hall, several computers, TV Room, Kitchen, Breakfast Room, and public refrigerator. A buffet breakfast is provided and one is welcome to prepare simple meals.

Daniel House is well situated. There are a number of hotels, restaurants, grocery stores and deli's very near by. It is two short blocks from the Gloucester Road subway station and bus stops. Kensington Palace and Gardens, the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Museum of Natural Sciences are all within walking distance. The London branch of the LDS Family History Centre is nearby and the beautiful Kensington Library which is the repository for the London library system's genealogy collection is a short bus ride away. The BIGHR tour included a London transit pass valid for tube and bus travel within Zone 1 and a first-class BritRail Pass. So getting around couldn't be easier.

There is a Research Leader (Sherry Irvine was ours; David Rencher will lead the 2000 tour) and a Director on the tour (Jean Thomason, Director of the Samford University Library always manages the tours). Jean is a wonderful person who quietly trouble-shoots any problems and ensures that each participant gets the most out of their BIGHR experience. I just loved her "Southern" mannerisms: it was easy to get used to being addressed as "Miss Claire." As well, there were several members of the tour who are veterans of this program and they were also full of tips and advice. Most of the tour members were fairly advanced genealogists so it was a great opportunity to learn - a kind of "genealogical immersion!"

Although there were several "free" days, in actuality every minute is organized to make the most of every opportunity. Sherry Irvine is extremely well organized and an expert on London (having grown up there). She herded us around with great efficiency. Of course, you are always free not to go with the group. The BIGHR tour is well established and respected and we received special handling at every research repository. Our research leader was always available for on-site help and one-to-one guidance. She provided a series of lectures in the evenings and even brought in a director from the Corporation of London Archives one evening for a fascinating talk on the "Freedom of London." In addition, many guided side-trips were squeezed in, such as a visit to one of the largest map-stores in the world, antiquarian bookstore browsing (Sherry knew where all the good bookstores were), cathedral tours, a short visit to the National Gallery, tour of the Museum of London, trip to Needham Market to attend a Genealogy Fair, etc. Time was truly at a premium but with good planning tour members also took in concerts at the Royal Albert Hall, musicals, cathedral services, museum tours, bus tours, Thames cruises and train trips all over the countryside. As the tour offers several options, it is possible to customize your trip to suit your requirements.

The basic tour included your room and breakfast at Daniel House for the duration of the trip. There was an option to travel with the research leader and director to Exeter for the middle week, where the group stayed in student residences at the University of Exeter (these were quite luxurious) and visited various repositories in and near Exeter. I opted to meet the group in Exeter for two days but to then travel with a distant cousin up to York and several points in between. Jean Thomason graciously accommodated my special request and worked out a price for me.

For months before the tour, I received by email and post, detailed information about the tour, preparatory information from Sherry Irvine along with websites to check out and email addresses for the other participants so that we could be in touch and chat about issues like currency and clothing.

Repositories Visited in London:

London LDS Family History Centre: This is a long but easy walk from Daniel House (20 min.); we received a brief tour from the Director of the Centre. The London FHC has a good collection of films regarding London in their permanent collection. They also have on microfiche the complete indexes for the English Births, Deaths and Marriages since 1838.

Society of Genealogists: There is a fee for non-members to use this facility - one visit was paid for through our tour. We were met by one of the head librarians and given a lecture and tour of the facility then were free to use it until closing. This is an extremely cramped but comprehensive repository. It has several unique collections like the Bernau Index of PRO Court documents, Boyd's "Inhabitants of London," Rogers Collection on Cornwall, Snell Collection on Berkshire, Campling Collection on Norfolk, Macleod Collection on Scottish families, Surname Document Collection, Dwelly Index of West Country material, Whitehead Index of East Anglian references, Fawcett Index of Clergy and North Country families, etc. Housed on several stories, the collection is roughly broken into three categories: Place, Surname and Subject (i.e. Heraldry, Religion, Armed Forces, Schools and Universities). Although the collection mainly focuses on English research, they also have a good collection of Scottish and Irish records and a representative collection on the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. The ground floor houses several card indexes, the microfilm and microfiche collection, and the wonderful bookshop. Membership is fairly steep but it includes their quarterly periodical and free use of the library so if you're planning a trip to London, it may be worthwhile. The facility is mainly staffed by volunteers so quality of help varies. I visited the SOG twice while in London. They have a useful website detailing their collection and publications: www.sog.org.uk/.

Family Records Centre: Not to be confused with the LDS FHC. This new government facility houses the part of the Public Records Office that was formerly at Chancery Lane, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and a very good genealogical bookshop. Admission is free but security is very strict. We were given a lecture and tour but had the unfortunate luck to arrive on a hot, sticky day when the air conditioning had broken down. The staff were in a panic and several had fainted and were going home as the building was stifling. Needless to say, these conditions did not deter the hoards of visitors (genealogists are a very tough bunch); if they had dared announce that they were closing the facility, they would have had a riot on their hands!

At the ONS on the main floor, one can use the giant index volumes on open shelves to look up births, deaths and marriages since 1838. Once found, a form is filled in and you can order the records at the bank of cashier wickets. The cost of �6 per certificate includes postage to Canada (or you can pick up the record in about a week). The ONS website is: http://www.statistics.gov.uk/registration/default.asp. Downstairs is a large locker room, washrooms, vending machines with sandwiches, etc. and a large lunchroom. On the second floor are housed all the English census films and related indexes; indexes to the Prerogative Court of Canterbury and microfilms of the original wills, inventories, administrations and probate; the PRO collection of Nonconformist Registers; rows of microfilm and fiche readers, photocopiers and helpful FRC staff. I visited this repository twice while in London. More information, including research leaflets, can be had through their website: http://www.pro.gov.uk/.

Kensington Library: Besides being the designated genealogical library for the Greater London system, the Kensington Library is the custodian of an excellent local history collection for Kensington and Chelsea. We had a most informative talk by the two local history librarians and access to the local history and genealogy computer database. Useful materials include: the British Biographical Database on microfiche, the British Record Indexing Society volumes indexing English wills, Harleian Society publications, Victoria County Histories, Illustrated London News, Index to the Gentleman's Quarterly, etc. It is free to use the library but the Local Studies and Genealogy section has limited opening hours (a great amount of material is stored in the basement or locked cabinets, rather than on open shelves).

Guildhall Library: As its name implies, this library is the repository for all records to do with London Guilds but there is also much more. We received an informative but lengthy lecture and tour by the Chief Librarian. The Guildhall Library Manuscript Section is also the repository for records relating to the City of London (Corporation of London records are held in the Corporation of London Record Office [CLRO], located next door) including parish registers, tax, probate and court records. Records go back to the 11th Century. It also has a huge library collection representing Greater London and other counties of England, including directories from 1677, poll registers, indexes to various newspapers, etc. It holds all the publications for all the English record and historical societies! The IGI, 1881 Census Index and the CD-ROM index to the Times of London are also available. The Prints and Maps Section has prints, drawings, photographs, maps and ephemera relating to London. Some of this collection is available on-line through the Collage website: http://collage.nhil.com/. The library materials are on a computer catalogue. The manuscript collection is mainly catalogued through a card index. This is a fairly new facility located next to the old London Guildhall. There is an excellent bookshop at the Guildhall Library. For more information, check their website:
http://ihr.sas.ac.uk/gh/.

Public Record Office, Kew: Here is a vast treasure-house of information. The Public Record Office (PRO) Kew is located outside of London in Richmond (towards Heathrow Airport). It is an impressive building surrounded by a huge pond and gardens and is close to the famous Kew Gardens. Again, security is very tight. Always be sure to bring your Passport and the full address and telephone number of your residence in London with you to all repositories as you may need this information to obtain a reader's pass. Purses, backpacks, fanny packs, binders and books must all be stored in lockers. We had an informative lecture and tour at the PRO Kew and the staff were very helpful. Documents here are records of central government - i.e. Army and Navy, Colonial Office, Exchequer (taxes of various sorts), Civil Courts, Criminal Courts, etc.
There are several research areas: the Reference Room with shelves of finding aids, Calendars describing the collections, research leaflets, and several computer catalogues; the main Reading Room where you order your documents and are given a pager that indicates your assigned reading table and when your document is ready for pick-up. For large documents and maps, you are usually directed to the Large Document Reading Room that also houses British Military Records. There is a good computer database to Soldier's Discharge Papers, 1760-1854 in this room. There is also a large library of periodicals and other materials of use to British historical researchers (the book I requested could not be located!!). On the main floor are the lockers, a large bookshop of genealogical and historical materials, washrooms and a cafeteria-style lunchroom. The PRO Kew catalogues (Calendars) are now accessible on-line: www.pro.gov.uk - click on the "Search" icon to get to the catalogues.

Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts (HMC): Located in Quality Court near the old Public Records Office at Chancery Court, this facility holds the key that may unlock important family information for you. They are the keepers of: the National Register of Archives (NRA), UK Archival Gateway (ARCHON) and the Manorial Documents Register (MDR). We were given a very informative lecture by a young archivist. In this little facility is amassed finding aids on archival collections for most repositories in the United Kingdom. A computer database, which is also accessible on-line, helps you discover materials which may be of interest to you. From there, an NRA number indicates the finding aid volume in the Reading Room which details that particular collection. This organization also keeps the register for Manorial Documents, many of which are in private hands. The Manorial Documents catalogues for Wales, all three Yorkshire ridings, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight are now on-line but it may be years before the entire catalogue of manorial documents is posted. ARCHON is an informative on-line service that lists details on archives throughout the UK and other useful data. The HMC has a small number of publications for sale. To access the various databases, go to the HMC website at: www.hmc.gov.uk/main.htm.

House of Lords Library: Needless to say, security was tight for this library which is located in one of the towers of the famous Parliament Buildings. We listened to a short lecture in the top of the tower while sitting around a table full of ancient documents and scrolls. The place was like a maze and had what must be the world's smallest public elevator ("Max. 8 persons" said the sign but we were squashed with only three). Here, one finds parliamentary records and documents like the Protestation Returns, Enclosure of Common Lands and many records relating to Estates. Several of our group stayed on to do research. Visit their website at: http://www.parliament.uk/.

British Library Newspaper Library: Located in St. Pancras, on the out-skirts of London, this was probably the most interesting lecture and tour we received. It was fascinating to be taken through the "back-rooms" of this facility to see the newspapers being preserved, microfilmed, bound and stored. We were even allowed to "run loose" in the stacks and pull volumes for a few minutes. The BL Newspaper collection includes newspapers, journals and periodicals from all parts of Britain and on all topics - just think of some obscure interest and there is sure to be a journal devoted to it! The Library also collects newspapers from all over the world, and is especially strong on the Commonwealth countries. The downside is that it is not particularly user-friendly. Our group all requested material but only two of us received our documents after waiting almost two hours and reading space is limited. There is a card catalogue and some finding aids in bound volumes. There is also a library of relevant material and some newspaper indexes on open shelves. Much of the collection has not been microfilmed so the researcher is often reading through original newspapers which is a great nostalgic treat.

British Library (BL): This famous repository was a bit of a disappointment. The building is new and quite striking, especially as it stands in front of an ornate Victorian building - the contrast is astounding. Inside are a lovely book and gift shop, thematic displays, artwork and several public facilities. Unfortunately, the library was not prepared for our group's arrival (someone on their staff had got the date wrong) and we therefore could not gain admittance to the Reading Room (there was quite a long line up for admission with only so many allowed in at a time). The British Library actually discourages public use and is known as a library of "last resort." As well as Library materials, the BL houses the former British Museum manuscript collection - I had wanted to see my seventh Great-grandfather's letters and notes but this was not to be. The BL catalogues and other interesting information are on-line at: http://portico.bl.uk/.

Repositories Visited Outside of London:

Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies, Canterbury: I opted out of this day-trip but those who went greatly enjoyed themselves, including the lovely lunch hosted by the Institute. Also in Canterbury are the Cathedral Archives and the Huguenot Archives.

Dorset County Record Office, Dorchester: I visited this RO on a Saturday morning. I made my microfilm reader reservation over the Internet and was able to cover a lot of territory during the three hours the repository was open on Saturdays. The staff was fairly helpful and I was thrilled to hold original Churchwarden Account Books in my hands. The catalogue is all on cards with several bound Finding Aids to the Dorset Parishes. With some help from the archivist, I was able to find my way around without any problems. In the Reading Room are printed volumes of Parish Registers, Bishop's Transcripts and other related materials on open shelves. There are also Surname Files maintained which could prove very useful (I didn't get lucky, of course). All archives require you to use good archival etiquette when handling original documents so be sure to apprise yourself of the rules. I had some photocopying done and these documents were promptly mailed to me in Canada with an invoice.

West Country Studies Library, Exeter: I visited this library with the Exeter contingent of the BIGHR tour. We received an informative, if harried, lecture and were set loose to research. Much of the collection is on a computer database designed by the Chief Librarian. The Burnet Morris Index is a unique slip-index to Devon references - the handwritten paper slips are often illegible and Heaven help you if you drop a drawer and get them all mixed up!! The Devon and Cornwall Record Society (DCRS) has a reading room here but you must buy a membership in order to consult their publications (you can use the printed volumes free at the Guildhall Library) and manuscript indexes; the West Country Studies Library computer database includes the DCRS materials.

Devon County Record Office, Exeter: This RO is housed in the same building as the West Country Studies Library. It is a fairly cramped facility with card catalogues to the various manuscript collections and a crowded microfiche reading room (most of the parish registers are on fiche). The parish register fiche collection is self-serve which speeds up the process somewhat. The staff here were not particularly helpful but they did have a fair crowd to deal with. There are a few publications for sale.

Northamptonshire County Record Office, Northampton: This facility is located on the outskirts of Northampton and proved a little hard to find on the first visit. The collection is excellent but it is accessed only through card indexes and some bound Finding Aids - no computerization here! Over the years, zealous archivists have created many types of indexes to Marriage Licenses, Poor Law Records, Wills and Administrations, Surnames, Town Records, Places, etc. These indexes are stuffed onto every available shelf space, some in flimsy cardboard drawers and piled on top of each other. There are microfilm and fiche readers available and Parish Registers have all been microfiched. The Parish Register fiche sets are available for purchase. Manuscript documents are ordered in the Reading Room (not between 12 and 2, of course, while the staff stops for lunch!!). This is a spacious room with large tables; the walls house the library collection of published materials on the county and printed parish register indexes, transcripts and Bishop's Transcripts in bound volumes. I did find that the handling of precious ancient materials (I handled huge land deeds on velum complete with seals dangling from the 16th Century, bound volumes of town records on parchment from the 16th Century and folded, grubby settlement certificates from the 18th Century) was very casual - no cotton gloves, weights or foam props were issued. In contrast, photocopying is regarded as blasphemous - the only alternatives are to copy things out laboriously by hand or to hire a photographer at great cost.

I visited this facility twice, I had requested a collection before my first visit and it was waiting for me upon my arrival. Another collection I requested could not be found and it was thought to be part of a large load of materials being worked on by their Chief Archivist. When she died several years ago, the material was all boxed up and has been sitting in a warehouse since! I had ordered a huge amount of photocopying on my first visit that was to be mailed to me with an invoice. My second visit was spontaneous but upon my arrival, the archivist asked if I was the same Claire Smith-Burns who had placed a photocopy order, if so, they had my documents ready. So I was able to pay for them and take them with me which made for great reading on the plane trip home. There is a small sitting room where one can consume food and beverages and a beverage vending machine. It would be wise to bring food with you as there are no restaurants or stores close by.

General Hints and Tips:

  •  Travel as light as possible - this makes travelling by Tube and Train easier.
  • Wear comfortable, practical clothes and bring two pairs of good walking shoes - I never did so much walking on a daily basis in my life!
  • You do not need dressy clothes - EVERYTHING is casual. Layered clothing can take you through all types of weather and temperatures.
  • I was warned that Traveler's Cheques are not always accepted so I went with only some cash and my Visa (best rate of exchange). I used my Visa for cash advances.
  • I brought a small backpack with me that accommodated my camera, notebooks, pencils, cardigan, had room for small purchases, bag lunch, etc. Most people had carry bags but I enjoyed being "hands free."
  • I kept my money and valuable documents in a small pocketbook that I wore slung around my neck - it really was ideal; I brought a money belt but never used it.
  • Buy stamps at a post office as booklets at grocery stores usually do not come in the correct denominations and the clerks have no idea how much it costs to mail a postcard to Canada.
  • It is easy and relatively cheap to pick up a variety of meals to go at most grocery stores; try to keep some food with you as it may come in handy.
  • Buy a small London A-Z book as soon as you arrive in England or before (Chapters does not carry them but several versions are available in London); this book is indispensable for maps, Tube Stations, Bus Routes, etc.
  • Buy all your film in Canada before you leave - film in England is very expensive; it's better to take too many photos than not enough!
  • Be very careful crossing streets - we tend to look the wrong way! Most London crosswalks have "Look Right" written on the pavement!
  • It is not a good idea to rent a car, especially in the cities - the rules of the road are quite different, round-abouts are everywhere and, of course, they drive on the wrong side! Good public transit exists to almost everyplace.
  • England comes to a grinding halt on Sundays, especially outside of London; be prepared as it can be difficult to obtain food (I had to go without lunch AND dinner one Sunday!!) and transportation.
  • Try to make arrangements ahead of time if travelling to one of your ancestor's churches; most are locked and it may be difficult to find someone who can let you in; Sundays are best; historically important churches in larger towns are generally open for at least part of most days.
  • Be security conscious: never leave windows open (not even a crack) in hotels and always lock your door; never leave valuables where they can be seen through a hotel-room window; never keep valuables in back pockets or jacket pockets - secure them close to your body where you can see them; leave valuable jewelry at home; be extremely careful at night and in crowded places.
  • Displaying a Canadian flag (on your backpack or as a lapel pin) can be beneficial - most Brit's consider our accent to be American and they generally aren't particularly fond of Americans.
  • British rail timetables are available through the Internet (be aware that there are many different companies operating British rail lines): www.rail.co.uk/ukrail/planner/planner.htm. Virgin Trains are great - try to take them whenever possible.

Research Hints and Tips:

  • Although I brought binders of information with me, I only took a coil-bound notebook with thick cardboard covers (to give support when writing in unaccommodating circumstances) and a few relevant notes into research repositories - most archives limit severely what you can bring in with you but provide lockers to store your excess.
  • Bring lots of pencils as most repositories only allow pencils - many do not allow erasers.
  • Laptop computers are okay in most facilities but they can be stolen and you must get special plugs, etc.; also they are heavy to carry around.
  • Keep a stash of 20p and �1 coins for lockers
  • Take a good current map of the country plus maps of your research areas showing parishes, towns, etc.
  • Don't try to do too much when you are there - pick two family lines (a main one and an alternate) and focus your research on those.
  • When possible, try to order manuscript collections ahead of your visit; this can save you valuable time.
  • Don't waste your time looking at records which are easily available here (i.e. most Parish Registers and Census records are available through the LDS); do your homework before coming to England).
  • Some records I found to be very useful were:
    • Poor Law Records and Churchwardens Accounts; most of these have not been filmed but many are on manuscript indexes at local Record Offices.
    • Wills, Administrations and Inventories: I only looked at pre-1858 records (the system was changed after this date) for the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Consistory Courts and Archdeaconry Courts for counties relevant to my research; many will abstracts and indexes have been compiled by the British Record Indexing Society (these volumes are available at some Canadian libraries) and by the local County Record Offices.

Okanagan Researcher: A Treasure from the Past

Okanagan Researcher, Vol. 16 (3), March 2000 A Treasure From the Past


Maggie Nuyten

An old manuscript book containing recipes and remedies was given to me by my father before he died. This book was passed to him from his Aunt Cissie to be kept for me. The oral tradition was that the book had been passed from mother to daughter or closest female relative since it had been started many years before. The books "back" was not broken although it's cover was in a sad state and was only attached by a few threads. The pages inside seemed to be in reasonably good shape apart from a few at the beginning which had the edges torn.

It was 1991 before I would have the time to do more than take it out of the brown paper bag it had been stored in. My only idea, at that time, was to put the book into a safe situation and condition, one that would make it possible for me to be able to pass the book on to one of my daughters in due course. The British Columbia Museum in Victoria helped me to find an antique book restorer who removed all the pages so that I could have copies made. Some of the original pages were too fragile to work with on a regular basis. After studying the writing, using the copies, I realised that the book had been muddled up; some of the oldest writing was NOT in order. Years later, after many tries I was able to rearrange the pages as they had been when the book was started. This was only possible with a lot of patience, time and the help of a grapho analyst, the watermarks inside the paper and a correct series of page numbers. The page numbers had been altered a few times by possibly three different people in the early 1800s; the earlier writers had originally composed and followed a well organised plan only to have it rearranged by their descendants. It was a great breakthrough and Mr. Asfhar was able then to rebind the book and make a special air-tight case for it. Everyone who had helped me with the sorting and preservation advised me to publish it, the University and Museum people all told me that they had not seen a recipe book which covered such a long period of time in one family. It is interesting from the point of view of historians, genealogists, grapho-analysts, women's studies, pharmacists, cooks, linguists and others.

Now came the genealogy work to find the writers' names and relationships. I knew NOTHING about beginning this task. The Genealogy Club in Kelowna showed me the basics and the LDS History Library was absolutely essential and tremendously helpful for my tracking down Aunt Cissie and her whole family. I did have some family oral records but most of the written ones are now not accessible because they are in the possession of a cousin who does not answer my requests for help. Aunt Cissie did not have any children, neither did any of her nieces so she chose the eldest great-niece (me), to inherit the book. It appears that her Aunt Jane gave her the book because she also did not have any children. Neither of Jane's sisters married so I presume that the book was passed to her in the hope that she would have a daughter. Alternately I need to trace her husband's family because it is possible that Jane received the book from her mother-in-law. Although I had heard parts of this story before I felt I had to prove the dates and certification before I could publish. I now know the dates of deaths, marriages, baptisms, names and addresses of the people who wrote in the book, back to about 1796. There I am stuck, stuck along with a few other genealogists researching the same family.

There is much oral history but none of it checks out, even Harry Susans has not been able to help. Maybe the family just dropped out of space!!!!!! Many of you know the feeling I am sure. This puzzle is not something I will just leave although I am now in the last stages of publishing the book. If and when I manage to trace the last three or four people (fortunately one person wrote recipes and remedies over a period of about seventy years according to the grapho-analyst), I will add the information so that my children have a complete history of the book back to 1650 when the first page was written. I plan to write my recipes and remedies in a second book which Mr. Asfhar has made from all the extra unused pages, watermarked 1827, they are stronger and whiter than any paper I have seen in books published 40 years ago.

Tracing these family ancestors has entailed writing many letters and e-mails to various parts of England, Australia, Europe etc. I have been amazed at how helpful people have been: for example the Brighton Museum in Sussex was able to identify a whole page of titles of dance music, which I had thought to be Public House names, from 1827. This turned out to be a great clue, which I am still following. The archivists of many counties helped a lot. Harry Susans, a genealogist, in London, England, found wills and death certificates for me. On a trip to England the people at the records offices, Guildhall, Museums, the British Museum, London University, the Welcom Institute, Arundel Castle etc. etc. were helpful and interested. The LDS library of fiches and films provided another great wealth of information and I appreciated the people who helped me with learning to use them. I learned that one has to follow any clue, even if it seems absurd at the time, often it proves to be the final piece of a particular puzzle. Also it was so easy to get off-track and start researching other angles about recipes and/or other parts of the family; for example: I found information and saw examples of the beautiful paintings done by one ancestor which now are stored at the Tate Gallery in London and it was hard not to be fascinated by the various herb concoctions and their possible modern usage.

This searching for my ancestors is continuing for me especially around the recipe book. I find the remedies and food ideas are fascinating and I would like to have the time to try some of them. A Pharmacist told me that we still use many of the herbs etc. but often under different names or put together under a brand name and patent. Somehow though the ones using opium, musk and truffles may be a little hard to duplicate and would be awfully expensive.

Okanagan Researcher: Some Central Okanagan Marriages

Okanagan Researcher, Vol. 17 (1), October 2000

Some Central Okanagan Marriages

Submitted by Robert M. Hayes

The following marriages (1888 to 1909) are recorded in the Vital Statistics of the Province of British Columbia. These records are now readily available on the Internet (BC Archives). The "B" number listed refers to the microfilm on which the entry is recorded, and the other entry indicates the book and item number on that film. These films are available in a number of libraries, including the Kelowna Regional Library.



Names




Marriage Date & Location




Film & Registration Number




Louis Morand and Salomee Quesnel




April 3, 1888; Okanagan Mission




B11387. 167676




Charlie Small and Mary Favell




Nov. 22, 1896; Kelowna




B11387. 167900




John Haynes and Christina Moore




April 23, 1894; Okanagan Mission




B13767. 413010




Henry R. Burtch and Gertrude E. Hayward




October 2, 1900; Kelowna




B I 1386. 166228




Francis Joseph McIntee and Villerie Caron




Jan. 10, 1900; Okanagan Mission




B11382. 117647




Harold C. Stillingfleet and Frances Maud Lambly




Sept. 12, 1901; Kelowna




B11387. 167907




William H. Spencer and Maggie May McKinley




April 23,1902; Kelowna




B11387. 167910




Francis Edwin Small and Gertrude Mary Budden




Nov. 6, 1902; Kelowna




B11387. 167912




William Cecil McKechnie and Zella Baright Robinson




July 30,1902, Peachland




B11387. 167751




William Samuel Munsen (Munson) and Clara Elizabeth Clarke




October 14, 1903; Kelowna




B11387. 167693




Charles Warner Mohr and Minnie McQueen




November 25, 1903; Kelowna




B11387. 167694




Odile Fasciaux and Madeleine Gruyelle




Feb. 24, 1903; Okanagan Mission




B11386. 166446




Hamilton Lang and Gertrude Lena Pope




June 17, 1903; Peachland




Bl1387. 167645




John Henry Bessette and Hattie Ella Rice




Oct. 20, 1904; Black Mountain




not filmed. 900435




George Samuel Brown and Mary Ellen Lefevre




Nov. 3,1904; Kelowna




B11386. 166236




Alfred Edwin Lye and Margaret Lilian Etlinger




Sept. 17, 1904; Kelowna




B11387. 167649




Joseph Ferman Bell and Nellie Florence Whelan




Dec. 14,1904; Okanagan Mission




B11386. 166239




Arthur Litton Lucas and Edith Mable Mair




Dec. 6, 1904, Okanagan Mission




B11387. 167650




Thomas Paton Hill and Kate Moore Boyer




October 11, 1905; Benvoulin




B11386. 166549




John Murray Black and Maude Murdoch




November 14, 1905; Kelowna




B11386. 166243




Alan Henry Crichton and Edith Alice B. Lambly




June 13, 1905; Kelowna




B11386. 166325




Ronald Helmer and Edith Lilian Pope




November 15, 1905; Kelowna




B11386. 166554




Palmer Brooks Willits and Ellen Carrie Bailey




May 10, 1905; Kelowna




B11387. 167037




Frederick William A. Wood and Vivien McKie




November 16, 1905; Kelowna




B11387. 167039




William Andrew Pitcairn and Annabella Lyon Buchanan




Nov. 23,1905; Kelowna




B11387. 167824




Arthur Horace Raymer and Edith Muriel Sma11




October 11, 1905; Kelowna




B11387. 167859





Frank Maxwell Stevenson and Chrissie J. MacDonald




Dec. 23, 1905; Kelowna




B11387. 167927




William John Beattie and Martha Elizabeth Fyffe




October 23, 1906; Kelowna




B11386. 166245




Hubert Bertram D. Lysons and Emilia Howard Thomson




June 19, 1906; Kelowna




B11387. 167655




Henry Cecil Mallam and Giffortina M. Thomson




February 6,1906; Kelowna




B11387. 167702




Oswald Allen Pease and Evangeline Agnes Begbie




Aug. 29,1906; Kelowna




B11387. 167825




Charles Martin Renshaw and Carolina Brent




May 16, 1906; Kelowna




B11387. 167860




Hugh Strathnairn Rose and Florence Amelia R. Ablett




Nov. 3, 1906; Kelowna




B11387. 167861




Antonio Casorso and Marguerite MacGarrity




September 5, 1906; Kelowna




B13748. 278404




William Lupton and Mary Helen Baird Aitkens




Nov. 21, 1906; Peachland




B11387. 167656




Robert Walter Carruthers and Raine Claire Talbot




April 9, 1907; Kelowna




B11386. 166331




William Fairall Hopkins and Louisa Miriam A. Budden




Nov. 6,1907; Kelowna




B11386. 166562




Albert Paul 0. Minzlaff and Dorothee M.K. Erbrick (Sneider)




Aug. 26, 1907; Kelowna




B11387. 167708




Burton McLellan and Amanda Davis




December 18, 1907; Kelowna




B11387. 167767




Clarence Roy Trusler and Margaret Matilda Wilson




Nov. 12, 1907; Kelowna




B11387. 167982




George W. Collins and Louisa Richards




December 21, 1908; Kelowna




B11386. 166341




William Alfred Dinnock and Gladys Margaret Jones




Sept. 23, 1908; Kelowna




B11386. 166395




Frank Varney and Mabel W. Goldsmith




November 10, 1908 Kelowna




B11387. 167008




Montague G.E. Woodmass and Katherine Angel Hobson




Sept. 19,1908; Kelowna




B11387. 167049




Thomas Russell Lewers and Mary Louise McCurdy




Nov. 28, 1908; Kelowna




B11387. 167658




Robinson Ridley and Hilda Margaret Heather




September 2, 1908; Kelowna




B11387. 167866




John Downton and Agnes Wanostrocht




November 21, 1908; Kelowna




B13765. 406619




Ralph C.H. Mansfield and Letitia Helen Mousely




Nov. 10, 1908; Kelowna




B13765. 406620




Louis Casorso and Catherine Depao (Depavo)




Aug. 25, 1908; Ok. Mission




B11386. 166339




Elisie Gauvin and Lydia Vigeant




Sept. 28,1908; Ok. Mission




B11386. 166500




Adelard Mallet and Marie Anne Vigeant




Sept. 28,1908; Ok. Mission




B11386. 167713




Jean Thibault and Adelina Vigeant




April 27, 1908; Ok. Mission




B11387. 167986




Frederick Marceleay and Clementine Ortoland




June 28, 1908; Peachland




B11387. 167712




Ernest Freeman Pratt and Rachel Moore




January 15, 1908; Peachland




B11387. 167829




James Brodie and Annie Gold




June 1, 1909, Kelowna




B11384. 143430




Frank George Budden and Lena Ross Brightman




July 7,1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166265




William Henry Botting and Mabel Elizabeth Eyre




Aug. 11, 1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166267




Robert Chambers Bennett and Norah Mary Vernon




Sept. 4, 1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166268




John Brixton and Bertha Redsull




September 24, 1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166270




Richmond Charles Barclay and Emma Maud Collins




Nov. 16, 1909, Kelowna




B11386. 166271




Cecil Henry Bond and Edith Magaret Thompson




Oct. 27,1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166274




Henry Caesar Childero and Sybil Christobel Allen




June 7, 1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166343




Ernest L. Clement and Margaret A. Whelan




December 22, 1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166353




James John Daviss (Davis?) and Annie Nicholl




July 21, 1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166399




M. James Fetherstonaugh and Vera Bertha Verity




Aug. 17, 1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166466




Edgar William Hall and Julia Dusket Hodkinson:




Feb. 27,1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166571




Albert Robert T. Krienke and Elizabeth Weaver




April 21, 1909; Kelowna




B11386. 166620




Harold Hornby Verity and Olive Ethel Allen




February 20, 1909; Kelowna




B11387. 167009




Ernest John Pettigrew and Blanche McGuin




June 12, 1909; Kelowna




B11387. 167832




William George Russell and Katherin Connell Moffatt




August I 8, 1909, Kelowna




B11387. 167873




Arthur Malcolm Skae and Mary Elizabeth Keefe




January 27, 1909; Kelowna




B11387. 167946




Charles Clarke and Agnes Rebecca Treadgold




June 9, 1909; Kelowna




B13765. 406618




Ferdinand Brent and Mathilda Berard




Feb. 22, 1909; Okanagan Mission




B11386. 166261